Suzanne Cory High School

The next instalment of our featured schools is Suzanne Cory High School in Melbourne’s western suburb of Werribee and named after the renowned Australian geneticist and current and first female elected president of the Australian Academy of Science, Professor Suzanne Cory. An amazing advocate of science and an inspiring female mentor for the school named in her honour.

TiS have been visiting Suzanne Cory HS for 2 1/2 years now as they were one of the very first schools to receive their telescope. We have had some amazing nights at the school this term and some exciting images to share. Even when it’s cloudy over Melbourne, there seems to be this gap over Werribee – I need to have a good chat with a meteorologist one day…

I will let Sophia describe the Suzanne Cory HS experience;
As the skies darken quickly as we enter the winter months, students are given the chance to survey the stars. Every Week A, Thursday, the school hosts a telescope program in which planets and stars can be seen through the telescope that Melbourne University has generously lent us. Learn the constellations in the night sky, navigate around the cosmos, and understand the wonder of the things that were always simply just above us. From the rings of Saturn, to the stripes of Jupiter, tiny specks in the night sky will no longer seem as insignificant as you once thought.
On the 29th of May, we attended the second night of the Telescopes in Schools program. The program was an opportunity to look thought the telescope and see planets and stars with our own eyes. As we tackled the cold, we learned information about the planets of the solar system and the stars that we see in the sky. Some of the planets we had a look at included Jupiter, Saturn and Mars, and we also got to view the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius. We even got to take photos of the planets through the telescope to keep for ourselves! There were teachers and astronomers who were able to answer and discuss any of our questions or queries. Overall, the program was a great chance to meet new people, discover interesting facts about space and have fun!
Sophia Pacheco and Tara Co   Suzanne Cory HS

We have also been taking some photos, I hope you enjoy them and they do come with a few surprises!

First up, you always get a lovely sunset over Werribee.

The Werribee sunset is always a joy to watch. Credit: Jacinta den Besten

The Werribee sunset is always a joy to watch. Credit: Jacinta den Besten

When the sun has set, the school looks gorgeous all lit up, if only the light pollution wasn’t a factor.

The View of Suzanne Cory HS at night. Credit: Bruce Drummond

The View of Suzanne Cory HS at night. Credit: Bruce Drummond

Then the moon rises. I am calling it a Tiger Moon – not sure if it’s a thing, but it might catch on. I took this through the Canon EOS 700D without a tripod. This was the most steady one…

Tiger Moon (is that a thing?) rising over Werribee. Credit: Jacinta den Besten

Tiger Moon (is that a thing?) rising over Werribee. Credit: Jacinta den Besten

The students are starting to learn how to use the telescope.

Sophia driving the telescope at Suzanne Cory HS. Credit: Bruce Drummond

Sophia driving the telescope at Suzanne Cory HS. Credit: Bruce Drummond

One of the teachers managed some great images through her phone of Saturn and Jupiter.

Image of Saturn taken with iPhone through the telescope. Credit Amanda Green

Image of Saturn taken with iPhone through the telescope. Credit Amanda Green

While looking at Jupiter we saw an occultation of not one, but two of Jupiter’s moons! That is what we discovered when we had a look at Jupiter on Celestia to figure out what we were looking at! That is Io AND Europa coming out from behind Jupiter together, Ganymeade is on the bottom and Callisto at the top. Have since discovered the App Jupiter Guide which shows the positions of the moons and Great Red Spot!

Image of Jupiter and 4! Galilean Moons (look closely) taken by iPhone through the telescope. Credit: Amanda Green

Image of Jupiter and 4! Galilean Moons (look closely) taken by iPhone through the telescope. Credit: Amanda Green

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